Texas Pete Pepper Sauce Review

Coming in at 29.9% this is a really flavorful sauce that’s worth picking up for your next batch of wings or burgers. The vinegar and red pepper gives it just the right amount of heat!

Texas Pete is a brand of hot sauce. It has been around since the late 1800s, and it’s made in Texas. The recipe for this pepper sauce includes vinegar, red peppers, sugar, salt, garlic cloves and spices.

Texas Pete Pepper Sauce Review

Want a sauce that’s as surprising on the table as it is on your plate? Texas Pete Pepper Sauce is exactly what it says on the tin. This is one remarkable pepper sauce, with its huge green tabasco peppers overflowing the bottle and a straightforward vinegar-forward approach. How does it compare? How effectively is the Temperature Harmonyd, and how do you utilize a sauce packed with entire chilies? Let’s take a look inside a bottle.

SUMMARY

Pepper Sauce from Texas Pete (4-Pack)

Pepper Sauce from Texas Pete (4-Pack)

4.5

In Texas Pete Pepper Sauce, Tabasco peppers take center stage (literally). Whole fresh chilies are crammed into a bottle with a delectable vinegar, salt, and turmeric infusion. It’s aesthetically appealing as well as appetizing. It’s also versatile, with applications ranging from plain greens to Cajun cuisine.

Temperature: Medium

Pros:

  • Appealing to the eye (whole peppers in a clear bottle)
  • It’s a simple ingredient, but it packs a punch in terms of taste.
  • Extremely practical

Cons:

  • Sodium levels are quite high.
  • Depending on how long the vinegar has been infusing, the temperature may vary.

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24th of March, 2022, at 2:19 p.m. GMT

Contents Table of Contents

Note: There’s a difference between “pepper sauce” and “hot sauce.” We treat them in the same way: with a spicy sauce composed mostly of chilies. There is considerable debate over whether Texas Pete Pepper Sauce is a “genuine” hot sauce, but it satisfies our definition here. In this review, we’ll use the terms “pepper sauce” and “hot sauce” interchangeably.

Flavor

The ingredients list for Tabasco Pete Pepper Sauce is as straightforward as the bottle itself. Tabasco pepper, vinegar, salt, sodium bisulfite (preservative), and turmeric are the only ingredients.

There are just four components in this spicy sauce, which is quite low for a hot sauce. Tabasco Original Red (three ingredients) and, of course, Texas Pete’s Original Sauce (five ingredients) spring to mind. Texas Pete Pepper Sauce is as basic as it gets, yet it accomplishes a lot with a simple approach.

To begin with, the taste is all about the vinegar, but there’s more depth here than you would imagine, despite the fact that this is a very clear hot sauce. On the front end, the taste is powerful, salty, and sour, and on the back end, it’s delightfully spiced. The peppers pervade the dish, both in heat and a subtle peppery freshness, with the turmeric providing an underlying earthiness (just a touch). Yes, it’s easy, but it’s also invigorating and addicting. To be honest, you could call this a spicy infused vinegar or a pepper sauce or hot sauce and be just as right.

On the subject of salt, Texas Pete Pepper Sauce has a high sodium content of 121 mg per teaspoon. So it’s in the salt category – a teaspoon contains 5% of your daily sodium requirement. If you’re managing your salt intake, use caution while using this spicy pepper sauce. Granted, the spout helps in the slowing down of things (more on that later), and a few dashes goes a long way in terms of taste.

With those fresh tabasco peppers in the bottle, Texas Pete Pepper Sauce on a spoon

Temperature Harmony

Tabasco peppers have a heat range of 30,000 to 50,000 Scoville heat units, similar to cayenne chiles. That’s a potent medium heat, much more so than a jalapeo (2,500 to 8,000 SHU).

However, there are a few components in Texas Pete Pepper Sauce that help to temper the hot sauce’s full heat. First, instead of being pureed like a pepper mash, the chilies are left whole in the container, allowing the capsaicin to gently escape through the pepper’s skin. Second, dilution, along with additional components, tempers the intensity, much like any other spicy sauce.

Texas Pete Pepper Sauce has a low-medium heat level in this situation. It has a spiciness that is similar to that of a fresh jalapeo. And the spiciness works well with the pepper sauce.

The heat begins by warming your tongue, then extends throughout your mouth for roughly five minutes. It’s never so hot that you need to get a glass of milk. At fact, the spiciness never made it to the back of my throat for me; instead, it lingered in the front with a protracted simmering feeling.

The taste is well-balanced, but I can understand how a lot depends on how long those fresh chiles stay in the vinegar. The more time you spend using the sauce, the spicier it will get, therefore your results may vary.

Usability

When I’m eating any green vegetable, Texas Pete Pepper Sauce may now be the first spicy sauce I grab for. It’s delicious on anything from fresh salads to green beans. In fact, I may now eat more veggies than I ever have in my life simply to have more opportunities to utilize this pepper sauce.

It was also delicious on every Mexican food I tested it with, adding just the proper amount of tangy vinegar flavor.

I could see this working well with any Cajun or Creole cuisine. Texas Pete Pepper Sauce has the same upfront vinegar appeal as a Louisiana Hot Sauce, which complements Southern foods well.

When it comes to the pepper to pepper sauce ratio, you could think to yourself, “Geez, there’s more peppers than sauce here; how much am I getting?” True, the Texas Pete Pepper Sauce container is filled to the brim with whole chilies, which adds to its collecting value, but it does have an influence on usage.

However, consider this pepper sauce a present that goes on giving. Fill your bottle with more vinegar, more salt (to taste), and a pinch of turmeric, and let the fresh chilies do their thing once again! It’s a fantastic technique to extend the usefulness and value of this pepper sauce. No, it won’t have the same pungency or taste right away, but after a few days of absorption, it’ll be OK.

Finally, the spout is the size of a toothpick, so it functions as a dasher sauce, similar to a Tabasco spout. That’s great news for limiting how much you consume, given the high sodium content of this spicy sauce and the small quantity in the bottle. Because you have greater control, you are less likely to use it all at once.

Collectibility

The original Texas Pete artwork appears on the label, which is nice, but it’s something that almost everyone has seen. The sight of all those fresh green Tabasco peppers visible through the glass is a memorable experience. It’s a lovely sight and a great conversation starter on the table.

The Score

In Texas Pete Pepper Sauce, Tabasco peppers take center stage (literally). Whole fresh chilies are crammed into a bottle with a delectable vinegar, salt, and turmeric infusion. It’s aesthetically appealing as well as appetizing. It’s also versatile, with applications ranging from plain greens to Cajun cuisine.

SCORE AT THE END 4.5
Overall Taste 4.5
Temperature Harmony 4
Usability 5
Collectibility 4.5
X-Factor 4.5

On a scale of 1 (lowest) to 5 (highest) (highest)

Texas Pete is a hot sauce from Texas. It has a spicy flavor and comes in a variety of flavors such as Original, Habanero, Chipotle and Ghost Pepper. The pepper sauce can be bought at many stores but you may find it cheaper online. Reference: where can i buy texas pete hot sauce.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is Texas Pete Pepper Sauce good on?

A: Texas Pete Pepper Sauce is a type of hot sauce that goes well on many dishes, such as tacos and eggs. It can also be used to make delicious Bloody Marys!

Is Texas Pete hot sauce spicy?

A: Texas Pete is a type of hot sauce that is considered medium-hot. It contains some vinegar but has no other ingredients, which make it not quite as spicy as others. Pepperoncini peppers are typically used in the making of this sauce and habanero peppers are often mixed with it for added heat.

Are you supposed to eat the peppers in Texas Pete Pepper Sauce?

A: No, you are supposed to eat the jalapeños in Texas Pete Pepper Sauce. The ones with no seeds and green peppers on them are called Anaheim Peppers

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