Koulourakia (Greek Easter Cookies)

Koulourakia are large and round, flavoured with rosewater or orange blossom water. They have a soft texture that is close to that of meringue.
The koulouraki season starts on Easter Sunday when the Greek Orthodox Church blesses the first eggs so they can be eaten for the following 40 days during Lent.

Koulourakia are Greek Easter cookies that are made with butter, flour, sugar, eggs and vanilla. They are typically baked in a round shape.

Koulourakia (Greek Easter Cookies)

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Koulourakia are traditional Greek Easter butter biscuits (pronounced ku-lu-rah-kee-ah). They’re traditionally produced on Holy Saturday and served with a cup of coffee or tea on Easter Sunday, along with tsoureki. Koulourakia is said to have originated in the Minonan culture of Crete about 2600 BC.

They have a buttery and delicate, sweet vanilla taste, and the sensitive crumb makes them crunchy on the surface and light and airy on the inside. Because of the egg wash, koulourakia are finger-sized, lustrous, golden brown biscuits. Koulourakia may be braided, swirled, shaped into little boats, or shaped like a S.

This delectable recipe just requires a few cupboard staples: milk, flour, butter, sugar, eggs, and baking powder. If using, flavor the cookies with vanilla extract, orange zest, and ouzo, a Greek alcoholic drink with an aniseed flavor. If you don’t want your koulourakia to crack on the exterior, don’t use too much flour while making them. Finally, sesame seeds may be sprinkled on top.

You should also try this recipe.

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Ingredients for Greek Easter Cookies

This recipe just requires a few basic Ingredients. Use a kitchen scale to ensure that the dosages are accurately weighed.

Baking powder – active baking powder is required for the dough to rise.

Use unsalted butter that is at room temperature. If it feels soft when you press your finger on it, the butter is ready to use. Allow it to soften a little further if it is still firm.

Eggs are an excellent binder.

Use all-purpose flour that hasn’t been bleached.

Use granulated sugar instead of powdered sugar.

Vanilla, orange, and ouzo are the ideal Ingredients for infusing these delicate biscuits with even more flavor.

Is it possible to make Koulourakia using Baker’s Ammonia?

Traditionally, baker’s ammonia is used to make koulourakia (or ammonium bicarbonate). It’s an old-fashioned leavening agent from the nineteenth century that’s hard to come by anymore. As a result, we utilized baking powder in our current recipe. Don’t worry about the quantity; a 1:1 ratio of baking powder to baker’s ammonia should enough.

Koulourakia is a Greek dish that may be made in a variety of ways.

Making koulourakia isn’t as difficult as you would assume.

Making the dough for the Koulourakia

To begin, whisk together the flour, baking powder, and salt in a mixing dish, then put aside. In a separate bowl, cream the butter and sugar together with a stand mixer until light and fluffy, then add the eggs and whisk until incorporated. Finally, add the grated orange zest, lukewarm milk, vanilla extract, and ouzo and whisk to combine.

Gradually include the dry Ingredients into the butter mixture and continue to mix until you have a soft, flexible dough that is not sticky. If necessary, add a little extra flour. Allow 20-30 minutes for the dough to chill.

Koulourakia reshaping

Now it’s time to give the dough a form. For your Greek Easter sweets, you may pick from a variety of twisted patterns. To begin, divide the dough into 24 even balls (diameter: 1 inch/3 cm).

For each piece, make a thin rope, fold it in half, then twist it twice to create a spiral. Twist rope is another interesting pattern to explore. Form an upside-down U and begin twisting the dough together lengthwise. You may also make an S-shaped cookie or a braided cookie. Simply said, be inventive!

Koulourakia in the Oven

Place each cookie dough on a baking sheet that has been buttered. After brushing each piece with an egg wash prepared from an egg yolk and milk, sprinkle sesame seeds on top.

Preheat oven to 350°F/160°C and bake cookies for 25-30 minutes, or until golden brown. Allow it cool on a wire rack before serving koulourakia during your Easter gathering.

Cooking Instructions for the Best Greek Easter Cookies

Make sure you balance the flour quantities carefully; if you use too much, the kouloukaria will break. If you don’t have a kitchen scale, gradually add flour until the dough is soft but still easy to knead.

You may omit ouzo or substitute another spirit like brandy, cognac, or whiskey.

Instead of alcohol, a tablespoon of orange juice may be used for added taste.

What is the best way to store Koulourakia?

Koulourakia may be kept at room temperature for approximately 2 weeks in a sealed container.

Is it possible to freeze Koulourakia?

Yes! Baked Greek Easter cookies may be frozen for up to 2 months if kept in an airtight container.

Ingredients

room temperature unsalted butter

Greek spirit ouzo (optional)

sesame seeds as a garnish (optional)

Instructions

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Step 1

Step 1

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Sift the flour, baking powder, and salt into a mixing basin.

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Step 2

Step 2

Sift the flour, baking powder, and salt into a mixing basin.

Combine the butter and sugar in a separate bowl.

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Step 3

Step 3

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Beat the butter and sugar together with a stand mixer until light and creamy. Add the eggs and mix well.

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Step 4

Step 4

Combine the butter and sugar in a separate bowl.

Combine the vanilla extract, orange zest, lukewarm milk, and ouzo in a mixing bowl. Mix thoroughly.

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Step 5

Step 5

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Gradually add the flour mixture to the butter mixture. It’s important that the dough be soft and flexible, but not sticky. A lump of dough should be able to be pinched off and rolled into a cord or narrow tube. Add a little extra flour if the dough is too sticky. Allow 20-30 minutes for the dough to cool before shaping into shapes.

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Step 6

Step 6

Beat the butter and sugar together with a stand mixer until light and creamy. Add the eggs and mix well.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit/160 degrees Celsius. Pinch off a piece of dough the size of a walnut to form the cookies. You should receive roughly 24 1 inch/3 cm diameter pieces.

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Step 7

Step 7

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Using a dinner knife, roll out a cord or thin tube of dough the length of a dinner knife.

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Step 8

Step 8

Combine the vanilla extract, orange zest, lukewarm milk, and ouzo in a mixing bowl. Mix thoroughly.

In order to make an upside-down U.

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Step 9

Step 9

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Twist it a second time. The dough may also be used to form spirals.

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Step 10

Step 10

Gradually add the flour mixture to the butter mixture. It’s important that the dough be soft and flexible, but not sticky. A lump of dough should be able to be pinched off and rolled into a cord or narrow tube. Add a little extra flour if the dough is too sticky. Allow 20-30 minutes for the dough to cool before shaping into shapes.

To make the egg wash, whisk together the eggs and milk in a small dish. Brush the cookie dough with the egg wash and sprinkle with sesame seeds before placing it on a prepared baking sheet.

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Step 11

Step 11

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Preheat oven to 350°F and bake cookies for 25-30 minutes, or until golden brown. Allow to cool on a wire rack before serving.

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